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12 O'Clock High (ABC, 1964-1965)

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ABOVE: Bob as General Frank Savage, commander of the 918th Bomber Group that was based in Archbury, England during WWII.

EPISODE GUIDE - **WARNING: CONTAINS SPOILERS**
 
NOTE: Reviews taken from the December 1991 issue of Epi-Log (Issue #13); Production numbers courtesy of material provided by Ellen Pliskowski 

Golden Boy Had Nine Black Sheep

"Follow the Leader" (#7301) - September 25, 1964
 
Savage's work with the 918th is being followed closely by top Air Force brass.  He's a one-star general with a command that might have been given to a colonel, but there is a purpose behind it -- unless the United States can make considerable improvement in its long-range daylight bombing, the allies will lose the air war.  So far Savage has flown every mission with his men, something that worries his superior, General Wiley Crowe, who regards this able man as anything but expendable.  Savage comes into further conflict with Crowe when he decides to have the whole squadron follow the bombing lead of bombardier Lt. Mellon, a youth with an unusually accurate eye.  Savage has an ear infection and cannot go on the next bomb run, and on the ground he suffers some anxiety lest Mellon, who is deeply troubled by the loss of a buddy, fails to live up to his expectations.  The result of the bomb run is worse than anyone could have dreamed -- the whole squadron missed the target and hit a school.  Unflinchingly, Savage sticks to his theory that the whole squad ought to drop on the lead of their best bombardier, and he makes a patient investigation of the bombsight before laying any blame on Mellon, who is now more troubled than ever.  Vindicated when it is found the bombsight used on the disastrous run had been damaged by flak before the bombing, Savage orders another daylight run and himself flies in it with Mellon as his bombardier.  Interceptors kill some of his men and wound Mellon, but his bombing is as accurate as Savage knew it would be and the result is one target pasted flat by all the bombs on the run. 
 

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ABOVE: Bob and Andrew Prine in a scene from "Follow the Leader".  The two later went on to guest-star as brothers in an episode of The Virginian.

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Mellon... Andrew Prine
Jill... Judy Carne
Lt. Bishop... Paul Carr
Sgt. Nero... Bert Remsen
Lt. Zimmerman... Jud Taylor
Gen. Pritchard... Paul Newlen
Capt. Gately... Dan Barton
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Beirne Lay, Jr. (co-author of the book 12 O'Clock High)
Directed by... Don Medford

"The Men and the Boys" (#7304) - October 2, 1964

The action appears entirely justifiable: Captain Wade Ritchie leaves the returning formation, which is under fire over the English Channel, to fight off enemy planes heading for the parachuting crew of Tom Lockridge's destroyed bomber.  But Savage, who'd given orders that no one was to leave formation, demands a court-martial for Wade, and a medal for Tom.  Wade's defense is that they're friends; Tom would do the same for him.  Savage doesn't think responsible young Tom, who plans to marry a pretty nurse, Lt. Libby McAndrews, and make the Air Force his career, would disobey orders for anyone.  Wade gets off with light punishment, but Savage is shunned by everyone for his insistence on going by the book, and is even in danger of having to answer embarrassing questions when Tom decides to turn down his medal.  But then Wade's gunner, injured in the disputed action, dies of his wounds, and everyone suddenly sees Wade had no right to risk his crew for Tom.  Then Savage is proved right all around when Wade panics in the next action and calls over the intercom for Tom to come to his rescue.  Tom cooly refuses and Savage, who has been hit badly in the shoulder, is left to take the plane he and Wade are in to safety.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Capt. Wade Ritchie... Lou Antonio
Lt. Tom Lockridge... Glenn Corbett
Liz Woodruff... Hazel Court
Lt. Libby McAndrews... Sally Kellerman
Jonesy... Alan Reed, Jr.
Pete... James Noah
Mike... James Secrest
Prosecuting Attorney... Lyle Sudrow
Defense Attorney... Lew Brown
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Harold Jack Bloom
Directed by... William Graham

"The Sound of Distant Thunder" (#7305) - October 16, 1964
 
Savage is appalled when he sees his new bombardier, Andy Lathrop, an amiable hick with two left hands.  But over the target the newcomer demonstrates stunning accuracy and later shows both bravery and resourcefulness in saving Savage when the plane goes down.  Recovering from injuries, Savage decides to make an Air Force professional out of Andy, and begins a program of study and training for him.  But the regime makes Andy so listless that Savage sends him for a day's leave in London.  Andy's a lonely celebrant drinking lemon squash in a pub when the owner's daughter, Mary, discovers him and suggests a real drink.  Result: he cheers up so much that Mary has to put him up for the night and get up at dawn to try to sweep him out before her father finds him.  But he's so helpless she ends up driving him to the base, and before they get there they are in love -- and he's late.  During weeks of Savage's displeasure and confinement to quarters for this, Andy thinks a lot of things over and comes up with an answer: Savage's ambitions are not for him.  All he wants is a plot of ground to farm, and a wife and family to love.  He goes AWOL to tell that to Mary, but when he leaves her to get a preacher, the pub is bombed and she is killed.  Savage finds him in the ruins mourning her and trying to care for a bereft little child.  He'll never bomb again, Andy says, not if this is what it does.  It is to stop this, Savage persuades him, that he is needed at his job, then he leaves so that Andy can, in his own good time, follow him back to war.

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ABOVE: Bob and Peter Fonda in "The Sound of Distant Thunder".

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Andy Lathrop... Peter Fonda
Maj. General... Carl Benton Reid
Sgt. Kanaka... Ralph Hanalei
Dorothy Hall... Mitzi Hoag
Mary Lean... Jill Haworth
Tom Lean... Hedley Mattingly
Jeep Driver... Charles Kuenstle
Lt. Smith... John Alderman
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Edward J. Lasko
Directed by... Don Medford

"The Climate of Doubt" (#7308) - October 23, 1964
 
When asked to include a side trip in his next bomb run, Savage disagrees with his commanding officer, General Crowe, in no uncertain terms.  What Crowe wants him to hit is a troop replacement depot near a French resistance cell.  His information on the trouble spot comes from a lovely resistance worker, Nicole Trouchard, a woman Crowe knows and loves and who is now visiting briefly in England.  Savage feels strongly that Crowe is being influenced by the woman who may not, for all he knows, even be working for their side.  But Crowe is his commander and the mission goes off as ordered.  But the casualties are high -- among them an engaging young Hawaiian veteran of sixteen missions.  The result if an official inquiry into Crowe's order.  He would like to but can't qauite bring himself to ask Savage to soften his account of what his attitude toward the mission had been.  But in the end Savage comes around to Crowe's way of thinking as he learns, first, that Nicole is quite authentically connected with the French underground, and also that the mission was designed to give encouragment to people the allies would need to help them when the time for invasion should arrive.  When he testifies, Savage says he thinks that it is Crowe's job to make such long range decisions as giving aid and comfort to the underground.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Nicole Trouchard... Viveca Lindfors
Col. Harry Charles... Bernard Fox
Sgt. Kanaka... Ralph Hanalei
Brig. Gen. ... David White
Maj. Gen. ... Carl Benton Reid
Dorothy Hall... Mitzi Hoag
Co-pilot... Jack Powers
Henri Lau... Jacques Roux
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Harold Jack Bloom
Directed by... Don Medford

"Pressure Point" (#7307) - October 30, 1964
 
An impending visit from Senate Appropriations Committee member Clayton Johnson reminds Savage of their last encounter: The Senator offered to shoot him because he didn't want his daughter marrying an Air Force man.  Now Savage is in a vulnerable postion: the bomb run losses have been high.  This is the first thing crusty Johnson hits at when he visits the base.  He'll recommend a cut in appropriations and no long-range daylight bomb runs.  But Savage has been arming his planes for better defense against fighters, and he knows the allies need to continue the runs if they're to win the war.  He goes on an unauthorized long-range run with the new armanment, comes back with his squadron intact, save for damage to his own plane that gives him a bad time as he works to save the life of a trapped bombardier, an exasperating young man who hasn't been able to make up his mind to marry an English girl pregnant by him, and who changes for the better in the crisis.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Major Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Sen. Clayton Johnson... Larry Gates
Sgt. Eddie Pryder... Robert Doyle
April Barrett... Elen Willard
Vicar of Archbury... Brendan Dillars
Gen. Pritchard... Paul Newlan
Sgt. Loren... Jud Taylor
Sgt. Nero... Bert Remsen
Maj. Rosen... Jason Wingreen
Capt. Mewlay... Robert Hogan
Lt. O'Leary... Bill Cort
 
Credits:
 
Written by... John T. Dugan
Directed by... William Graham

"Decision" (#7310) - November 6, 1964
 
General Crowe's order is that the factory at Laon be flattened if it takes every bomber on the base.  All his information suggests the Germans may be making guidance systems for unmanned missiles there and they must be stopped.  Savage resents the order because Laon has already cost him so many men, and it is with reluctance that he puts his good friend, Major John Temple, on the next run.  Temple's plane goes down and he and four of the crew are brought to the factory and held there while Lord Haw Haw is given a message for Savage advising him not to bomb the factory lest he kill his own men.  But to Crowe the target is still critical and must be put out of business.  Savage pleads for one chance to save his men.  He thinks he can read on reconnaissance photos an effort by the American prisoners to point out which part of the vast factory complex houses the really critical operation.  But while Savage is getting permission to go in alone and hit just that one building, the picture is changing for the prisoners.  Their German commander saw the recon plane, knows the prisoners indicated the vital part of the factory and he's moved everything to another building.  During the raid in which a wrong building is once more being pasted, Temple and his men seize a chance to escape -- only Temple makes a decision, too.  He grabs a truck, uses it to demolish the new location of the factory's vital operation and loses his life in the process.

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ABOVE: Frank and Wiley have one of their sometimes heated discussions in this scene from TOH.

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Maj. John Temple... Tim O'Connor
Col. Alfred Hoeptner... John van Dreelan
Sgt. Nichols... Steve Harris
Lt. Peters... Peter Duryea
Lt. Kinner... Hunt Powers
Sgt. Weinstock... Kip King
Corp. Moody... Buck Taylor
Aide... Walter Friedel
 
Credits:
 
Story by... Clair Huffaker
Teleplay by... Clair Huffaker and Jack Turley
Directed by... William Graham

"The Hours Before Dawn" (#7309) - November 13, 1964
 
General Savage is called to London for a briefing with General Stoneman and General Crowe, and is upset since he should be back at the base preparing for an important upcoming mission.  In fact, they have called him in to explain why the mission against Hamburg has been called off: the Luftwaffe has ammassed a huge quantity of fighters and is waiting for the B-17s to arrive, making the mission suicidal.  Instead, he is to be sent to Dorman against a new oil refinery.  He will be the only one to know about the mission, and will not tell his men about the change until they leave in the morning, despite the fact that the group has already practiced the attack on Hamburg for two weeks.  Leaving the office, Savage admits to Wiley that he thinks the mission change has been handled badly and should not rely on only one man outside of headquarters knowing about the changes.  After studying the plans for the mission, Frank leaves headquarters and is odered by Crowe to not talk with anyone -- including headquarters -- about the mission before he leaves.  Heading back to base, Savage finds himself in the middle of a bombing raid, but keeps driving since he must get back to the base.  Finding a bridge knocked out, he takes a side road to another crossing, but a bomb makes a near dierct hit on his car, causing him to crash into a tree.  Luckily he is not badly hurt and is pulled out of the car by a passerby and a beautiful girl who lives nearby.  When another air raid starts, Savage is forced to seek shelter in the country mansion of Jennifer Heath, the beautiful passenger that helped pull him out of the car.  As the bombs fall around them the house is demolished, and the girl goes into hysterics, but that is the least of their problems: nearby a German bomber has been shot down, and a survivor, a wounded German flyer named Peter Raff, enters the house and takes them prisoner, making it impossible for Savage to inform his squadron that they must not go on the suicidal Hamburg raid. 
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
 
Guest Cast:
 
Jennifer Heath... Glynis Johns
Peter Raff... Fritz Weaver
Doker Drew... John McLiam
Maj. Colin... Maurice Dallimore
Col. Meyers... Robert Brubaker
Gen. Stoneman... John Zaremba
Policeman... Gil Stuart
Sgt. Albert... Eric Micklewood
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Donald S. Sanford
Directed by... Don Medford

"Appointment at Liege" (#7311) - November 20, 1964
 
Major Gus Denver has a powerful reason for wanting to bomb Liege: his entire crew was killed on a mission over the city while he was back in the States, having been ordered by Savage to deliver reports on combat tactics to Washington.  Denver wanted to stay with his crew, and blames Savage for his not being on the destroyed B-17 when he was needed.  Meanwhile, Savage is in a meeting with Gen. Crowe, and Frank is more than upset that he has been ordered to bomb a railroad yard at 8,000 feet -- a mission that is nothing short of suicide, as the brutal flak will result in 40 to 50% casualties.  He agrees to perform the mission after being informed that experienced pilot Gus Denver will soon be back on base from his leave in the U.S.  When he does arrive, Harvey finds that Denver has a decidely fatalistic attitude, almost suicidal in nature, as if he thinks that he should have died with his crew.  Going to the 918th canteen, Denver gives everyone else the same impression, as if he only returned to base to die in the next mission.  While Savage is trying to figure out how to handle Denver, Harvey is wondering if the pressure of the job might be getting to Frank as well.  The next day the tough mission that was scheduled is called off because of bad weather, and the 918 is sent to bomb some sub pens.  While flying the mission, Denver has to fly at a lower altitude -- against Savage's orders -- because they lose oxygen and a wounded man cannot breathe.  But instead of heading for safety he flies straight into some thick flak and bombs some anti-aircraft guns.  Within seconds of dropping their bombs, Denver's B-17 is hit by flak in the nose, killing two crew members.  Back at base, Savage talks to several people on the flight before Denver returns, and they seem to think the major was trying to get shot down.  When Denver lands, Savage jumps on him for trying to kill himself and his crew -- who agree with Savage -- and the general grounds him despite Denver's protests that he was taking the correct course of action.  Now the squadron believes Denver is responsible for the deaths, regardless of what his real intentions were, and Savage is considering having him court-martialed --  while Crowe believes him to be a hero.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Maj. Gus Denver... Gary Lockwood
Lt. Irene Cooper... Nancy Kovack
Liz Woodruff... Hazel Court
Lt. Col. Chandler... Burt Metcalfe
Lt. Charley Vale... Yale Summers
Lt. Benning... Peter E. Deuel
Radioman... Jonathan Lippe
Sgt. ... Wynn Pearce
 
Credits:
 
Story by... John McGreevey
Teleplay by... Charles Larson
Directed by... Don Medford

"Interlude" (#7306) - November 27, 1964
 
By the time bomber losses have made Savage seem inhumanly hard and unfeeling, he is ordered to take two weeks away before he cracks up.  With no destination in mind, Savage buys passage for Scotland, just behind a lovely Wren, Ann, whose friends have come to the station to bid her a tearful goodbye.  She's brave until they give her a gift of wartime treasure -- a pound of bacon -- then she's nearly in tears, too.  It's the bacon that cements the acquaintance with Savage when he accidentally knocks it from the train window and it's gone forever.  Ann is at first furious with him, then later contrite, and by the time it's all cleared up, they're friends.  He is by accident going to the same place she is -- the lovely Scottish isle where her home is, but she doesn't tell him that she is going home for good.  There will be no return to the Wrens for her.  At home with her father, Adam, she entertains Savage, shows him the country, and walks and dines with him until they are both in love.  When his leave is up, they part sadly and it is only by coming back impulsively with a gift of ham to replace the lost bacon that Savage learns Ann is dying.  In the pain fo losing her this way, Frank is able to cry, and, a whole human being again, returns to his job in the war. 
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Ann Macrea... Dana Wynter
Adam Macrea... Rhys Williams
Macutcheon... Arthur Malet
Ticket Seller... Ashley Cowan
Lt. Butterford... Molly Roden
Dawson... Don Spruance
Sam... Roy Dean
Dr. Gunn... Jack Raine
Capt. ... Ken Berry
Eddie... James Wixted
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Dean Reisner
Directed by... William Graham
 

"Here's to Courageous Cowards" (#7315) - December 4, 1964

Flying a B-17 high above Gremany is Major Morse, an easy-going officer who is respected by his crew.  One of his men, Sgt. Jimmy Smith, has illegally brought aboard a non-crew member, clerk Corporal Ross Lawrence, who wants to see what a real mission is like.  Smith allows Ross to shoot the waist gun, and he immediately shoots down a German fighter, but freezes up afterwards.  Back at their base, Smith sneaks Ross off the ship, but later admits to Major Morse who really shot down the fighter.  Morse believes Lawrence is a natural shot, and wants him to retrain as a machine-gunner.  Ross declines without revealing why, making Morse wonder if there is more to Lawrence than what meets the eye.  Meanwhile, General Savage wonders about Morse, who seems to be heading towards a complete breakdown.  When Morse finds out that Corporal Lawrence, a clerk on Savage's staff, is a conscientious objector, he reveals this to Savage in a meeting where Savage berates Morse for high casualties on the missions he has directed.  By this point everyone on base knows about Lawrence and his conscientious objector status.  Harvey tries to make Savage understand that the boy is a mixed-up orphan who is performing a job to the best of his ability -- and is serving his country faithfully.  Nonetheless, it is a hard pill to swallow for the rest of the squadron, who are taking high casualties.  Savage goes to Lawrence to discuss the matter with him, but reaches no certain conclusions with the boy.  Further complicating the situation is the fact that Lawrence's girl, Peggy, is the daughter of a three-star general, a man who confuses conscientious objector status with outright cowardice.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Cpl. Ross Lawrence... Brandon de Wilde
Maj. Joseph Morse... Gerald O'Loughlin
Peggy Livingston... Noreen Corcoran
Sgt. Jimmy Smith... Jimmy Hawkins
Capt. Wilson... Danny Coleman
Ground Crew Chief... Michael Harris
Sgt. Meadows... John Newton
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Al C. Ward
Directed by... Don Medford
 
(NOTE: Cut from the finished product was Noreen Corcoran as Peggy Livingston, Lawrence's girlfriend and daughter of a three-star general who confused conscientious objector status with cowardice.  Instead, it is Lawrence himself who confuses these things.)  

"Soldiers Sometimes Kill" (#7314) - December 11, 1964
 
General Savage arrives back on base in his staff car, acting as if he is very drunk, but Harvey believes it may be something else and orders Doc Kaiser to come over to Savage's office to look him over.  It turns out that the general has received a severe blow to the head from falling debris during an air raid, after having left a briefing in London.  He has a temporary loss of memory, and had no recollection of anything that happened after the air raid, and only made it back to base because Lt. Ryan found him wandering the streets.  Luckily, Frank has not missed a briefing as the mission was called off because of weather.  But it turns out that General Savage has greater problems to deal with, as the air raid becomes increasingly significant when a Scotland Yard detective arrives to tell him that he is now a prime suspect in a murder which occurred during the time of his blackout.  Savage reveals that he met the girl who was murdered, although he cannot tell Inspector Thorne more than that.  Unfortunately, as they talk further every clue indicates Savage's guilt, so he has his driver take him back to the restaurant he patronized the previous night so he can investigate the matter further.  As the evening goes on he continues to question people he saw before the air raid, but continued discussion only revives memories that indicate that he was with the girl at the time of her death, so he reluctantly takes a taxi to Scotland Yard, where he will turn the matter over to the proper authorities.

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ABOVE: Savage is accused of murdering model Barbara Talbott (Victoria Shaw) in "Soldiers Sometimes Kill".

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Inspector Thorne... John Williams
Barbara Talbott... Victoria Shaw
Nicholas Redgrave... Murray Matheson
Lt. Ryan... Tom Skerritt
Maitre'd... Patrick O'Moore
Morrison... Barry Macollum
Padget... Terence Vliet
Maj. Rosen... Jason Wingreen (his appearance may have beencut)
 
Credits:
 
Story by... Edmund H. North
Teleplay by... Edmund H. North and Charles Larson
Directed by... Sutton Roley

"The Suspected" (#7313) - December 18, 1964
 
The 918 returns home, and Harvey warns Savage that a nosey war correspondent is making a major nuisance of himself.  Savage avoids the man, named Moran,  and stops to talk with Sgt. Driscoll about what an excellent job he is doing in the squadron.  The sergeant asks Savage if he will join him and his new wife for supper (they are celebrating Mrs. Driscoll's being pregnant).  After Driscoll leaves, Moran catches up with Savage, but seeing the enlisted man walking away he suddenly announces that Driscoll is really named Turner -- and is an escaped murderer from St. Louis.  Later at Driscoll's house, Savage, not believeing the murderer story, questions Driscoll about his background.  The young man indicates he is from California and has never been east of the Rocky Mountains.  This satisfies the general, but Moran continues to badger Savage about the matter.  He digs for information on Driscoll, and insists he wants to interview the boy.  Savage wants no part of the deal, even after hearing Driscoll/Turner murdered his step-father by beating him to death with a tire iron, after which he was given a sentence of life inprisonment.  Savage finally agrees to the interview, and although he tries to dispel Moran's suspicions, the reporter still insists on continuing his investigation by having Driscoll's fingerprints checked.  When the reporter mysteriously dies, Savage finally begins to believe that Driscoll may be a murderer after all.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Jim Driscoll/George Turner... Michael Callan
Clifford Moran... Edward Binns
Meg Driscoll... Antoinette Bower
Phillip Fraser... John Orchard
Cpl. Wagner... Nick Blair
Maj. Rosen... Jason Wingreen
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Jack Turley
Directed by... Don Medford

"An Act of War" (#7302) - December 25, 1964
 
Savage is upset when the squadron, led by Major Cobb, returns and Joe claims their target was completely destroyed -- the latest of several such reports he has given, all of which turn out not to be true.  Savage is furious when photos show the target intact, and General Crowe is equally upset over the conflicting information.  Only seventy-two hours are left before the target -- an airframe manufacturer -- starts shipping aircraft parts that will eventually be used against Allied forces.  To find out what the truth is regarding the status of the factory, Savage decides to fly a B-17 at tree-top level all the way to Metz to observe it first hand.  He takes along Lt. Mario Canello, and they discover that the bombed factory was a fake, with the real one being located in a nearby woods.  Unfortunately, Savage's on-the-spot investigation results in his being shot down behind enemy lines.  Savage crashes the B-17 and survives the landing, but after leaving the destroyed aricraft he is attacked for no apparent reason by a young Frenchman.  The fight results in the stranger's death, and Savage doesn't notice that the fight was observed by the man's mute son.  Also unknown to Savage is that the local collaborationists are not friendly to bomber crews because of the attacks by aircraft in the area.  When Frank later meets the son, he cannot make the boy understand he needs help, and only then learns that the young man cannot speak.  The general is understandably upset by his helpless situation, and his inabiility to warn his squadron that they must bomb the woods to destroy the factory.  As he considers the problem, he hears German voices coming in the direction of the shack he is hiding in, but, luckily, the boy sends them away.  When the boy finally does get Savage some help, it turns out he may have been better off with the Germans, as the boy believes Savage murdered his father, and the collaborationists are only interested in executing any bomber crew member they may find.  Because they believe that Savage killed their friend, the peasants' decision to hang the airman is unanimous.

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ABOVE: Bob in a scene with Michael Davis (Paul Cadol) in "An Act of War".

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
 
Guest Cast:
 
Paul Cadol... Michael Davis
Belloc... Emile Genest
Lt. Mario Canello... Norman Fell
Malot... Al Ruscio
Verenne... Jay Novello
Maj. Dwight Herrick... John Kerr
Ianville... Marcel Hillaire
Sgt. Nero... Bert Remsen
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Donald S. Sanford
Directed by... William Graham

"Those Who Are About to Die" (#7316) - January 1, 1965

While at the 918 canteen, Savage reveals to Harvey that the mission they are to fly the next day will result in one-third of their men not returning home.  The next morning his men receive a  briefing, and Savage explains that not only will they not have the fuel to take evasive action against oncoming German fighters, but they will have to fly over two-hundred miles without escort -- a sure ticket to disaster.  Luckily, before the briefing is over, Savage is told that the mission has been scrubbed because of bad weather.  However, the entire squadron is confined to the base as they may be required to leave at any time.  The combination of bad news of the upcoming mission and the anticipation of when they will have to leave gets on everyone's nerves.  After two days of postponements, crews that normally get along well begin bickering and fighting among themselves, resulting in a rash of disputes that Savage has to take care of.  As the fog continues postponing the dangerous mission, Captain Thomas Lockridge, a recent hepatitis victim, is hardest hit by the tension.  Tom needs only one more mission before his tour is over, and although he wants to fly, Doc Kaiser insists that he is not ready.  Although Lockridge has a reasonable excuse for not going on the suicidal mission, he feels that he is letting down the squadron -- and believes his fellow flyers feel the same way.  Nurse Libby McAndrews tries to get Savage to order Tom not to fly to stop his feeling of guilt, but Savage decides that it would be best for everyone involved if Lockridge worked out the problem on his own.  Later, Gen. Crowe arrives to talk to Frank about the postponements, and how they are affecting the 918th.  Doc sits in on the meeting and explains that the stress of the waiting over the last few days has certainly reduced the level of efficiency within the 918, and that their flying the mission now will only result in even greater casualties.  Crowe agrees and decides to give the mission to another squadron.  Both Crowe and Doc are taken back when Savage announces that the 918th MUST fly the mission, despite possible increased losses.  If they don't fly the mission and someone else does, the effect on moral will be devastating.  Crowe reluctantly agrees, but when word gets out that Savage is forcing them to go on a suicide mission, near mutiny breaks out among the squadron.

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips

Guest Cast:

Capt. Tom Lockridge... Glenn Corbett
Nurse Libby McAndrews... Sally Kellerman
Sgt. Hale... Ken Lynch
Maj. Lloyd... Phillip Terry
Sgt. Rutherford... Dee Pollack
Lt. Muncie... Robert Yuro
Lt. Parmalee... Tom Skerritt
Lt. Jensen... George Brenlin

Credits:

Written by... Harold Jack Bloom
Directed by... Abner Biberman

In Search of My Enemy" (#7317) - January 8, 1965

Savage is attending a party after being invited there by his girlfriend, Liz, who doesn't warn him that she also invited his former fiancee, Ann.  When Ann shows up, Savage learns that she is now married to a pilot, Major Gray, who will soon be assigned to his group.  Frank is upset with Liz's test of his feelings towards her, and leaves.  The next day he does some checking on Maj. Gray, and has to reluctantly agree that they have much in common besides Ann.  That afternoon Frank goes out for a walk and encounters Ann, who is upset that her husband has been transferred to Savage's base.  She cannot bear the thought of being near the general, but Frank cannot honor her request to transfer Gray out, as he needs the pilot's help.  Later that day Savage is briefed by Crowe on a highly dangerous mission that must be carried out the next day.  Unfortunately, every one of his squadron leaders is in the hospital or otherwise unavailable, and Maj. Gray is the next in line according to rank and experience.  Gray is also just getting out of the hospital from a landing accident.  While Doc Kaiser is speaking to him at the hospital, he accidentally reveals how serious Savage's relationship with Ann was.  Gray now begins to wonder if he is being sent on the mission to get him out of the way -- perhaps permanently -- so Frank can get back together with his wife, who stands a good chance of becoming a widow the next day.

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Liz (Hazel Court) tests Frank's love for her by secretly inviting his former fiancee to a dinner party in order to see his reaction.

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips

Guest Cast:

Maj. Peter Gray... Steve Forrest
Ann Gray... Barbara Shelley
Maj. Jake Hays... Roy Thinnes
Liz Woodruff... Hazel Court
Lt. McCall... John Milford
Capt. Butcher... Don Penny
Lt. Grenfell... Burt Douglas
Cpl. Weatherby... Jo Helton
Lt. Fowler... Bob Kanter

Credits:

Story by... Jean Holloway
Teleplay by... Stanford Whitmore
Directed by... Don Medford

"The Albatross" (#7312) - January 15, 1965

Savage and his men are enjoying an amateur play when Harvey arrives with a message that the squadron's mission the next day will be carried out as planned.  Just then the air raid siren sounds and enemy bombers start to pound the area.  Among those taking shelter in the raid are Lt. Joey Kane and his British fiancee, Angie.  They escape injury, and later Savage calls Kane into his office to ask the young man if he will fly another mission, even though he has enough for rotation to the States.  He agrees as a favor to the general, even though he wants to get home so he can marry his fiancee.  After leaving on the mission, Kane suffers disfiguring burns during a fighter attack on his B-17 while trying to help another crewman.  After arriving back at base, Doc Kaiser examines Kane and reveals to Savage that the aspiring young actor will have to find another occupation in civilian life, as his facial injuries are extreme.  Savage waits until Kane is off heavy sedation to visit the boy, and tries to apologize for the accident -- one that has destroyed half of his face, and, as far as he is concerned, the rest of his life.  Angie and two of Kane's friends pay him a visit, but the lieutenant refuses to see anyone.  Savage goes in anyway, but finds that the more he tries to make amends, the more resentment he stirs in Kane.  Savage reaches the point that he berates the boy for not appreciating the fact the he is still alive, but that fails to reach Kane as well.  After Savage leaves for a briefing in London, Kane goes beserk and destroys his room, and the general is called back to the hospital.  After a few more days have passed, Kane still refuses to see anyone and Savage decides he must force the young man into returning to work, even though Doc believes that his psychological problems will prevent him from functioning normally for a long time to come.  Despite Doc's reservations, Savage continues to try to bring Kane out of his depression.

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips

Guest Cast:

Lt. Joey Kane... Robert Drivas
Angie... Janine Gray
Sentry... Don Eitner
Lt. Ankers... Martin West
Nurse... Dale Hogan
Lt. O'Toole... Paul Lukather

Credits:

Written by... Richard Landau
Directed by... William Graham

"The Lorelei" (#7319) - January 22, 1965

General Savage becomes uneasy when his new deputy commissioner arrives.  Colonel Mark Royce seems qualified for the post, but he possesses an unusually superstitious nature.  Even when planes come in for a landing after a mission, he crosses his fingers for luck that they will land ok.  This seems to work when the Lorelei -- a B-17 named after the mythical female who lured men to their deaths -- lands as scheduled, except that the crew never leaves the plane.  When Doc Kaiser enters the aircraft and examines the airmen he discovers every last man is dead.  This spooks everyone, as no one can determine who landed the plane, and Royce seems particularly shook by the strange occurrence.  That evening Savage is having a drink with Royce when the colonel's wife arrives and explains that she operates "Bundles for Britain", and is in England for a brief stay to make a delivery from the U.S.  After Savage and Royce return to the 918th operations building, there the general tells his new deputy commander that Royce will fly the Lorelei the next day on a milk run mission.  For good luck Royce removes the name Lorelei and adds a four-leaf clover -- a futile gesture as it turns out when the controls jam during the bomb run, causing the B-17 to leave formation.  Without the mutual protection of the other bombers Royce is nearly shot down by attacking fighters, but the pilot manages to hide in a cloud bank until the controls free up.  The ship makes it home in one piece, but by now everyone is convinced the ship is jinxed.  That evening Major Royce is told that he will lead the group the next day on another mission -- in the Lorelei.  Royce agrees to fly the aircraft again only after a heated argument, but when he does the controls freeze up again, resulting in the entire squadron missing the target.  Like it or not, Savage may have to face the fact that he is operating with a doomed ship in his squadron.

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips

Guest Cast:

Col. Mark Royce... Rip Torn
Carole Royce... Diana van der Vlis
Lt. Danton... Bruce Dern
Sgt. Cryder... Paul Sorensen
Lt. Myrowitz... Barry Russo

Credits:

Written by... Albert Aley
Directed by... Don Medford

Faith, Hope, and Sergeant Aronson (#7318) - January 29, 1965
 
General Savage is hit with flak on a mission, and a shortage of available beds necessitates placing him in a ward rather than the private room he rates.  After examining the general, Doc Kaiser explains that a specialist is needed to operate on Savage as he has a piece of metal near his heart.  Kaiser is not qualified, as the smallest mistake will kill Frank.  Crowe agrees to fly in the only specialist in the world qualified for the heart operation, but before Doc can speak with him further a nurse arrives and requests the doctor's help with a patient.  Doc arrives too late, after the boy passes away.  The situation drastically effects his friend in the next bed, Sgt. Herschel Aronson.  Savage is brought in and is placed in the bed next to Aronson, a man who has lost all desire to live since his best friend's death.  Frank cannot help but to hear Doc Kaiser trying to cheer up the young man, and Savage decides to restore Aronson's faith -- which proves to be almost as big a challenge to Savage as flying a mission.  Over the next couple of days Savage tries to cheer the man up, but matters only seem to get worse.  After Aronson finally decides to get out of the hospital, he heads into town where he meets a young lady who gets him out of his gloomy mood.  In fact, the young lady makes him so excited that he falls down a flight of steps and has to be hospitalized again.  Only then does he learn that Savage is close to death -- and the airplane carrying the incoming heart surgeon crashed while landing, killing everyone aboard, eliminating just about any chance of the general's survival.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Sgt. Herschel Aronson... Sorrell Booke
Ivy Westcott... Antoinette Bower
Sgt. Barstein... Joseph Perry
Nurse Jenkins... Phyllis Love
Sgt. Gruenwald... James Frawley
Sgt. Fry... Charles McDaniel
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Charles Larson
Directed by... Laslo Benedek
 
To Heinie, With Love (#7321) - February 5, 1965
 
General Savage arrives at officer's quarters to tell his men that a new navigator will be arriving.  Savage welcomes the new navigator, Lt. Kurt Muller, to his crew but eventually realizes that the young officer is a dangerous loner.  On their first mission out Muller gets upset when one of the men calls him "Heinie", a reference to his German background.  While enemy fighters attack the squadron the two men are in a fist fight instead of manning their guns, nearly causing Savage's plane to be shot down.  Once on the ground, Lt. Magill, the crewman fighting Muller, reveals that a billfold fell out of Muller's pocket, and Savage finds that it contains a photo of a man in a German uniform standing in front of a swastika -- Muller's father, an American Nazi party member.  Savage says nothing to the boy but finds himself hating Muller, as a friend of his was murdered by members of the U.S. Nazi party.  Meanwhile, Muller meets and falls in love with a local girl who is deaf.  He spends so much time with her that he misses the briefing for the next day's mission, a tough one that his performance will be critical on, as the entire squadron will bomb on his command.  Muller ends up erring badly on the important bomb run, then later gives no aid to a wounded bombardier who bleeds to death by his side -- a situation that earns Muller the hatred of the crew.  They are neither interesed nor willing to listen to his excuses, but when Savage learns the reason for Muller's behavior, he tries to make him a valued and respected member of the crew -- a feat made almost impossible be Muller's lone wolf attitude.
 
Regular Cast:
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Kurt Muller... Keir Dullea
Nora Burgess... Jill Haworth
Lt. Pike... Ralph Williams
Lt. Magill... Stewart Moss
Gen. Pritchard... Paul Newlan
Sgt. Bergen... Bard Stevens
Lt. Daniels... Jimmy Hayes
 
Credits:
 
Story by... Gilbert Ralston
Teleplay by... Gilbert Ralston and Charles Larson
Directed by... Ralph Senensky
 
The Clash (#7320) - February 12, 1965
 
Savage's plane has been hit hard while on a mission over Norway, and incoming fighters shoot down his plane into the sea before he can make it back to land.  With his entire crew either dead or wounded, Frank is the only one to survive the crash into the sea.  Inflating a life raft, he sees another live pilot floating in the sea -- not one of his men, but a German fighter pilot who was shot down.  Now forced to share his life raft with the Nazi fighter pilot who shot down his B-17, Savage learns that the Nazi officer is armed and determined not to be captured by the Allies.  As hours, then days, go by, air patrols search for Savage and his crew, but even when an aircraft comes near the raft, Col. Dieter refuses to allow Savage to shoot a signal flare.  After coming through a storm that nearly kills both pilots, the German continues to refuse to allow Savage to signal for help whe Allied planes fly overhead.  The wounded but armed German officer insists that Savage keep rowing, and eventually they reach an unoccupied channel island between France and England.  This gives each man an equal chance of rescue from German or Allied personnel, but when they reach the island Frank gets away by swimming to shore and hiding behind rocks.  Dieter starts after him, but his foot gets caught in some rocks below water, and when the tide comes in he will drown -- unless Frank helps him.  Savage cannot simply wait for the man to drown, as by that time the raft would have floated out with the tide with the flare gun and supplies.  But if Savage tries to save the German, the Nazi may simply shoot him after being rescued and keep the raft and miniscule supplies for himself.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Col. Hans Dieter... Albert Paulsen
Col. Chandler... Burt Metcalfe
Maj. Rosen... Jason Wingreen
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Jack Turley and Meyer Dolinsky
Directed by... Joseph Leytes

The Ticket (#7322) - February 26, 1965
 
Lt. Paul Stiger is a happy-go-lucky pilot who accepts every high-risk mission that comes along, to the point that he sometimes scares his crew with the chances that he takes.  Stiger seems perfect for a mission Crowe and Savage have cooked up, involving using a P-51 Mustang fighter to destroy a dam with two five-hundred pound bombs.  Since it would be too hazardous to fly B-17s on the mission, the two generals believe a lone fighter could make it through all the defenses the pilot will be up against.  Savage talks to Stiger, and he agrees, possibly because of critical comments from his crew that the "farm boy" should go home and get used to using a rake again.  About the only one who appreciates Stiger besides Savage is a young British girl named Myra.  As it so happens, Myra sells Paul a bunch of coupons for a raffle, one that he never figures on winning.  Meanwhile, Stiger studies his mission and practices on other targets, in which he performs flawlessly until Myra arrives to announce that Paul has won the sweepstakes -- nearly $30,000 -- and for the first time in his life the young man has something to live for.  He has considered himself nothing more than a red neck farm boy, but for the first time he can see a possible future for himself.  Once everyone knows Stiger will be getting the money he finds himself surrounded by "friends" -- the same people who wouldn't speak to him the day before.  The next couple of days are non-stop parties, and Stiger begins to fall apart as he shows up late for practice and begins to worry about surviving the one-man mission.  Finally reaching a point that there is no time left to find and train a replacement pilot, Savage has to commit himself to using Stiger, even though Paul no longer shows any sign that he can perform the mission.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Paul Stiger... Earl Holliman
Myra Bentley... Elen Willard
Lt. Lou Crain... Donald Harron
Lt. Morgan... Jud Taylor
Sgt.... Hal Riddle
Corporal... Glen Sipes
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Al C. Ward
Directed by... Josef Leytes
 
The Trap (#7323) - March 5, 1965

General Savage, while staying at a London hotel, is trying to work out the details of a mission when Harvey arrives to tell him he needs to slow down and get some sleep before the important meeting the next day.  Although it is 2:00 AM Savage decides to go for a walk, and finds himself caught in a London air raid.  With all the air raid shelters full, Frank and several civilians are forced to take refuge in a nearby basement in an abandoned building already damaged by bombs.  After being led there by an air raid warden, the man is killed in an explosion as he tries to get back to his shelter, and he is the only one who knows their location in the abandoned building.  Savage finds himself in a basement shared by a con man, a duchess, a young Welsh miner, and a girl expecting a baby.  The occupants get shook up as the building they are in takes some near-direct hits by falling bombs, and the beams holding up the structure are close to collapsing.  Finally another string of bombs fall in the area and cause the building to collapse.  With their group now buried alive in the building and not knowing if anyone is aware of their location, Savage and the others become more desperate when a delayed action bomb lands in front of the shelter's only exit -- and could go off in seconds.  To make matters worse, the pregnant woman begins to go into labor, and the "doctor" with them turns out to be a talented con artist.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lady Constance Belden... Hermione Baddeley
Bert Higgs... John Leyton
Dr. Lewis Glenway... David Frankham
Air Raid Warden... Jack Raine
Eleanor Nichols... Dinah Anne Rogers
Civil Defense Worker #1... Ashley Cowan
Civil Defense Worker #2... George Pelling
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Richard L. Newhafer, Chester Krumholz, and Charles Larson
 
Directed by... Ralph Senensky 
 
End of the Line (#7324) - March 12, 1965
 
Major Gallagher doesn't go on a mission because of a bad cold, although he expresses some guilt about missing the assignment to Nurse Claire Cummings.  His guilt takes a definite turn for the worse when he is informed that his replacement, Larry Hollinder, has been badly hit on what was supposed to be a simple mission.  Joe rushes out to the field to meet his plane, only to be informed by Savage that it is too late.  Afterwards, Savage approaches Gallagher about taking a hazardous mission, one involving his flying a single plane raid against a gestapo headquarters to stop the execution of a resistance leader.  Joe agrees to take the mission, and reveals to Savage another problem: Hollander had told Joe before he was killed about a girl he was engaged to, and now Gallagher's feelings of guilt over the death of his buddy make him feel that it is his responsibility to assume all the dead man's obligations, including looking after May Hudson, the girl Larry was engaged to.  Joe's feelings on the matter are magnified because they had been close friends for many years, and it was Joe who talked Larry into becoming a pilot.  Although it is not his duty, he feels obligated to tell May of Hollinder's death, and when he breaks the news she seems to take it well -- perhaps too well.  Joe's prolonged visit with May causes him to miss a briefing with Savage and Crowe, and a date with his girlfriend Claire, who can't understand his spending the evening with May, or his accepting a dinner date with her the next evening.  Over the next few days, May, a master manipulator, manages to twist Gallagher around her little finger, he not realizing that she is little more that a bar room hooker who has decided to marry a wealthy American to live an easy life.  She has no feelings for anyone but herself, but manages to use Joe to obtain whatever she wants, and even gets him to propose after pretending to be pregnant.  Meanwhile, Gallagher is missing meetings and blowing practice runs because of her distracting him, a situation that may cost the lives of him and his crew on the upcoming mission.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Maj. Joe Gallagher... Paul Burke
May Hudson... Sarah Marshall
Lt. Claire Cummings... Barbara Feldon
Capt. Whitelaw... Ben Wright
Nell Forrester... Florence Sundstrom
Lt. Lewin... Charlotte Stewart
Capt. Carmichael... Michael St. Clair
Lt. Dinardo... James Douglas
 
Credits:
Written by... Dean Riesner
Directed by... Sutton Roley

The Threat (#7325) - March 19, 1965
 
At the Officer's Club, the local traveling barber, Gilbert Bright, drops by to give officers their haircuts.  Savage and his men are enjoying playing darts and listening to the radio from Berlin, when Axis Sally suddenly says that General Savage will soon meet with a fatal accident.  To prove her point, she tells the men of the 918th to expect a surprise to come their way.  Moments later the motor pool explodes, although it is impossible to tell if it was an accident or sabotage.  Over the next couple of days rumors become rampant that a spy is on the base, and as the Nazi broadcast continues describing what is happening on base, it becomes obvious that there is an enemy agent keeping Sally informed of what is happening.  Tension mounts with everyone under suspicion, including a nurse who nearly gives Savage an overdose of morphine instead of antibiotics for a cut.  Savage and Crowe begin listening to the announcements and running down leads on people who may be working for the Germans.  Crowe even asks Savage to go somewhere safe until the threat blows over, but Savage refuses, feeling that it will destroy morale in the squadron.  Frank continues flying missions despite Axis Sally's threats, and the woman even describes his flights in detail.  By this time everyone in the squadron is shook up, but Savage gets a lead as to who the spy might be when he learns that the nurse who nearly killed him, Adrienne Dietrich, is not only of German descent, but is the sister of a young flyer who died while under Savage's command.  He is also told that she pulled a great many strings just to be assigned under Savage, so the general confronts her with this information.  While she admits to blaming him for her brother's death, she insists that the morphine was an accident.  After leaving the hospital Savage is nearly run down by an enlisted man in a Jeep, who insists it was an accident.  It appears that the boy is telling the truth, still leaving no leads as to who the informant really is, or how Savage will meet his untimely death.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Gen. Wiley Crowe... John Larkin
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Adrienne Dietrich... Stanja Lowe
Gilly Bright... Laurence Naismith
Col. Reed... Harold Gould
Cpl. Jones... Jack Grinnage
Cpl. Smith... Don Spruance
Col. Chandler... Burt Metcalfe
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Jack Turley
Directed by... Ralph Senensky
 
Mutiny at 10,000 Feet (#7326) - March 26, 1965
 
Young Lieutenant Tony Kemp, who has plans of his own for sitting out the war in some neutral country, spreads the rumor among his officers and men that General Savage is unfit for command.  During a flight, Savage finds his new crew  insubordinate their first time out, when an engine failure makes them want to turn back.  Savage, as commander of the plane and leader of the squadron, has no intention of aborting the mission.  Subtly, Kemp and Phil, another crew member, feed fires of antagonism set burning by this incident.  After the plane has set down on the base, they even produce a pill box for the others to see, one they say has fallen from Savage's pocket.  A stimulant and a sedative are indentified as the pills.  Savage, Kemp whispers, is taking them secretly, and it's a combination that would render him unsafe.  Meanwhile, Savage, unaware of this, is to detour on the way home from a bomb run to drop leaflets in Austria.  The idea of phamphleteering infuriates him.  On the run to deliver the leaflets, Kemp sees a chance to consolidate his plans.  They have to pass over Switzerland to get to Austria, but when two engines cut out, the plane is utterly unable to make the climb over the Alps.  It is Savage's decision to turn back to France so that if they have to ditch, they will at least be over terrain with a friendly underground.  Kemp seizes on this, whispers to the men that it's evident Savage is crazy, since France is in German hands, and enlists them individually to back him in taking over the plane for a landing in neutral Switzerland where they can sit out the rest of the war.  He is persuasive enough to get their support, but when he goes to take over control of the plane, Savage, backed by a crewman's gun, shows them how crazy Kemp is.  If they live, he points out, there will be a court martial, and which of them can swear he was crazy or incompetent?  Are there any doctors or psychiatrists present?  Little by little he breaks the men down until the truth of Kemp's chicanery comes out.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Lt. Tony Kemp... Larry Blyden
Sgt. Phil Reese... Robert Brown
Lt. Ray Thacher... John Kerr
Liz Woodruff... Hazel Court
Sgt. Laz Coleridge... Jess Pearson
Gen. Stoneman... John Zaremba
Lt. Patterson... Lee Meriwether
Lt. Murry Epstein... Stuart Margolin
Maj. Towson... James Dobson
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Harold Jack Bloom
Directed by... Sutton Roley
 
The Mission (#7327) - April 2, 1965
 
Savage doesn't know at the time his mission is laid out that one of his crewman, Joe Waller, is detested by two other crew members.  His capable navigator, Lt. Gunther, remembers a time when Waller froze on the bombsight of a B-17 while it went down and its crew was machine-gunned.  Only Waller and Gunther got out alive, and Waller's nickname since has been "Wash Out".  Indeed, he has never gone back to the bombsight and has become increasingly hostile.  The mission is too important for Savage to spend time on feuds.  For months he has been trying to bomb the enemy's oil supply line.  Now, Intelligence comes up with word that the line they've been bombing is a dummy; the real one lies beneath a field of cabbage.  Savage is to lead seven planes away from a regular bomb run and make a run for a strike at the oil line.  As he takes off, the bickering begins back in the waist, with both Gunther and Maglie sniping at the edgy Waller.  The antagonism among them grows so that they can't drop the quarrel, even when they discover one of the bombs is jammed askew in its rack and probably will not jettison with the rest.  But by this time the enemy has caught onto the maneuver and a fighter attack is mounted immediately.  When the bombardier is killed, Savage summons Waller to the job.  While those in the waist deride him, he goes forward to guide the plane over target.  His aim is the faultless one Savage knew it would be.  But thereafter the plane is in so much trouble from fighters and flak that Savage has to devote his entire attention to steadying it while Waller goes back to the waist to ponder the problem of the jammed bomb.  With the plane steadied but losing altitude fast, Savage orders everything not fastened down thrown overboard.  While the men do this, Gunther keeps needling Waller.  But when Waller finally jumps him, it is to save him from a machine gun burst from a fighter not expected this far from target.  Gunther is hit, but in the shoulder instead of the chest, and it remains for one of the other men to tell him, just before he passes out, that Waller saved his life.  By this time there is plainly nothing to do but abandon ship.  With Gunther unconscious and unable to parachute himself, Savage has to decide to stay with the plane and its bomb.  He orders everyone out, giving a curt "no" to any who offer to stay and help.  But, unknown to him, Waller does not jump with the rest of the crew.  Instead, he comes forward to offer to take Savage's place, since, as he says, he is worth so much less to the war effort than the general.  That draws fire from Savage, who scolds him for negativism and for feeling sorry for himself.  This challenged, Waller decides to straighten up and be a man.  First he solves one problem by shooting away the supports that hold the bomb while the plane is over the channel.  Then he takes his place by Savage's side as his co-pilot and helps him bring the ship in safely.

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ABOVE: Bob and Burt Brinckerhoff in a scene from "The Mission".

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
 
Guest Cast:
 
Joe Waller... Burt Brinkerhoff
Lt. Gunther... Chris Robinson
Lt. Michaels... Bruce Dern
Sgt. Maglie... Rudy Solari
Lt. Farrell... Robert Hogan
Capt. Dirksen... Forrest Compton
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Samuel Roeca
Directed by... William Graham

"The Cry of Fallen Birds" (#7328) - April 9, 1965

One more near-brush with the roof of a manor house at the end of the new southwest runway convinces General Savage he's going to have to get a demolition order.  General Stoneman, meanwhile, is pleasantly occupied in accepting a congratulatory plaque from the people of Archbury, and when Savage comes to him with the news that the house must go, Stoneman has lots to say on the subject of tact, good relations with the locals, and so on.  Savage calls on Lady Catherine Hammet, the lovely, dark, sensitive owner of the manor house, to tell her he is going to have her house condemned.  The house isn't Savage's only problem.  For weeks the 918th has been trying to bomb Blaustadt, a university town where airplane parts are being manufactured.  And for weeks weather has closed the target out for them, much to Savage's relief, because an old friend, a professor, is now living there, and he can't bear the thought of the bombing.  One more mission and one more failure over Blaustadt leaves Savage's plane so badly damaged that he and co-pilot Joe Cobb have to crash land it in the field in front of Lady Catherine's, then depend on swerving the plane on the ground to avoid collision with the house.  When the manuever, which is successful in missing the house, is over, Savage is badly wounded and, in the face of a breaking storm, has to be carried inside for examination and care.  He proves too wounded to move, and Lady Catherine herself helps care for him during illness and delirium.  By the time he is better, she has a different opinion of this man who, in his fever, raved of the friend he didn't want bombed and asked over and over if he had missed her house.  Lady Catherine, a self-condemned exile in the old house, is soon in love with him, to the distress of Capt. Derek Evans, the young Englishman who has known her since childhood and loved her almost as long.  He has something of a better idea of what is wrong with Catherine than Savage does.  She was too sheltered by her father and when she tried to break away she ran straight into tragedy with a man she expected to marry and who didn't tell her soon enough that he was already married.  When her father died, she then came to this house and has not since set foot outside.  Savage, confronted by Evans with the news that he is to have his wish -- the Crown has granted him permission to tear the house down -- has now to face the fact that he is going to have to be very cruel to Catherine. With understanding gained from his talk with Evans, he does the thing that will help her most.  He insists that he house must go and that if she loves him, must live elsewhere.  It was, he proves, love of the house, not of him, as she now turns to Evans to help her bear the loss of her shelter, then step forward into life.  Savage goes on to his next job -- the bombing of Blaustadt.

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips

Guest Cast:

Lady Catherine Hammet... Dana Wynter
Capt. Derek Evans... Lloyd Bochner
Gen. Stoneman... John Zaremba
Bridget Foote... Nora Marlowe
Maj. Hickey... John McLiam
Cpl. Smith... Don Spruance

Credits:

Story by... Edward J. Lasko
Teleplay by... Edward J. Lasko and Charles Larson
Directed by... Walter Graumann

"'V' for Vendetta" (#7330) - April 16, 1965

Savage faces a problem with the visit of Wing Commander General Brad Hoagland, a man who once coveted Savage's job in the field.  Now, of course, he is finding fault with him.  His complaint is that whenever the primary target is closed in, Savage always chooses to dump his bombs over Manheim.  They're not ready for Manheim yet, he argues, it's too well defended.  When they are ready, they'll send everything they've got over it.  In vain Savage argues that meanwhile a large factory in Manheim is manufacturing FW fighters and anything he can do to cramp their style is a gain for the war effort.  Unconvinced, Hoagland later summons Maj. Gus Denver, Savage's squadron leader, for an interview, asking him if Savage's policy of trying to hit Manheim were not a dangerous one, if there were not losses over this target he persists in choosing.  Uneasily, Denver says there were.  Confirmed in his opinions, Hoagland quarrels with Savage again.  He is going to see, he threatens, whether Headquarters approves of this personal vendetta of Savage's.  Pointing out that from the vantage point of his office job, Hoagland knows nothing about aerial warfare, Savage suggests that before he goes to Headquarters, he go on a mission with him.  They have an easy one -- the railyards at Eindhoven -- coming up.  Hoagland agrees, but over target later the plane is hit and, with two engines afire, Savage orders his crew to bail out.  Hoagland, who has been flying co-pilot while Denver does some photography, goes back, opens the hatch and jumps as the others are getting ready to parachute down.  At that moment Savage sees that the fires have been put out by the wind from the plane's descent, and the engines that have stopped can now be started.  Savage calls out a negative on the jump, then sees that Hoagland, hanging below his parachute, is being attacked by a fighter.  A moment later he is dead.  Denver, hard hit by this disaster, lets Major Stovall know later that he agrees with the theory that Savage is a man with a personal vendetta.  Stovall advises him not to let this upset get the better of him.  But Denver has a problem on his mind -- he overheard some of the differences between Savage and Hoagland, and since Hoagland was the only one killed there will be an inquiry into what happened over target and Denver will be bound to be questioned.  The thought disturbs him.  Savage quizzes him later on what is troubling him, learns what it is, and tells him he must do what he thinks is right.  What Denver then does is to turn himself in to sick bay, claiming a relapse of a nervous breakdown.  It remains for Savage to talk him into reporting for the next day's mission.  Then, on it, Denver loses his entire crew and is really in danger of cracking up.  Ship to ship, Savage talks him into a safe landing, and what Denver says of the general to the Inquiry Board doesn't hurt Savage at all.

rlsavage8.jpg

ABOVE: Bob with Gary Lockwood, who played Major Gus Denver in two episodes -- "Appointment at Liege" and "'V' for Vendetta".

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Maj. Gus Denver... Gary Lockwood
Gen. Brad Hoagland... Lin McCarthy
Gen. Pritchard... Paul Newlan
Maj. Bragg... Ken Berry
Lt. Perkins... Mike Doherty
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Al C. Ward
Directed by... Walter Grauman

"P.O.W.", pt. 1 (#7329) - April 23, 1965

General Savage, on a bombing mission, is shot down over Germany.  The P.O.W. camp he and his crew are taken to is run by Captain Staufman, a brutal SS officer, and his commandant, urbane Col. Max Richter, a pair in some disagreement about the handling of prisoners.  But Richter is in command and by his order Savage is kept in luxurious isolation -- except for a daily ride with the colonel.  He will try to escape, Richter points out sagely, and he may as well learn the terrain around the camp.  But, he will not succeed.  Since Richter came to this camp, eight tries have been made with eight failures and much loss of life.  Savage has this in mind when he first talks to the ranking officer among the prisoners, Capt. Brail of the R.A.F., who offers him a chance to join a tunnel escape now ready to go.  Savage declines the offer, and advises against the escape.  But escape is a matter of morale to P.O.W.'s; it gives them something to hope for, something to do, and it is, at any rate, axiomatic that they must try to escape.  Brail's escape is a failure.  But, it is hope, says Savage when he is released from solitary confinement, that distinguishes men from beasts, and he has planned another escape.  It will begin by his kidnapping Richter.  Seeing in Savage a personal antagonist worthy of his mettle, Richter continues the daily drives with him, predicting he will win the duel between them.  Savage says nothing, continues planning, scheduling the escape to coincide with Allied air raids for the cover they will provide.

tohguest2.jpg

ABOVE: Bob is flanked by John van Dreelan and Alf Kjellin in this scene from P.O.W.

Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
 
Guest Cast:
 
Col. Max Richter... Alf Kjellin
Capt. Staufman... John van Dreelan
Moxey... James Farentino
Baby... Jim Shane
Doc... Peter Haskell
Group Capt. Morris Brail... Donald Harron
Flight Lt. Harry Forrester... James Forrest
Guard... Henry Rico-Cattani
Lt. Melvin Regis... Don Penny
Lt. Smith... Steven Brooks
Guard... Sasha Harden
Lt. Coley... Richie Addams (scene cut before broadcast)
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Al C. Ward
Directed by... Don Medford

"P.O.W.", pt. 2 (#7329) - April 30, 1965

On the day of the escape, one of the P.O.W.s almost spoils the plans by getting into a quarrel with a guard, but he had done well, lifting ID cards and whistles from the guards so that confusion can be caused at the moment of breakout by blowing the whistles all over the grounds.  In crudely effective German uniforms, Savage and five others escape the camp, drive to Richter's under the pretense of taking him for his drive.  By the time he senses that something is wrong, he is their captive.  When pursuers loom, Baby, one of the prisoners, hurls huge gasoline containers at them, breaking up the chase.  But Richter has been hurt and is bleeding badly.  Moxey, one of Savage's crew, advises abandoning him to his fate, but Savage humanely leaves Doc to take care of him in the shelter of the woods, while he himself races to an underground contact in a nearby town to arrange a rendezvous with a fishing boat after an air raid he knows is scheduled.  Splitting with the other men to head for the rendezvous spot, Savage first leaves the weak and helpless Richter at a farmhouse, then heads for Cuxhaven, where the boat is to pick them up.  Richter, soon in contact with Staufman, is horrified to learn Staufman wants to shoot the escapees and trails him to the rendezvous and shoots him instead.  But then he faces Savage -- who refuses to be captured and wins the duel that takes place between them.

tohguest1.jpg

ABOVE: Bob with Alf Kjellin in a scene from "P.O.W.".

Regular Cast:

Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing

Guest Cast:

Col. Max Richter... Alf Kjellin
Capt. Straufman... John van Dreelan
Moxey... James Farentino
Baby... Jim Shane
Doc... Peter Haskell
Dr. Erlich... Oscar Beregi
Guard... Kurt Landen
Guard... Chris Anders
Merchant Seaman... Norbert Sigfried

Credits:

Written by... Al C. Ward
Directed by... Don Medford

"Hero" (#7331) - May 7, 1965
 
Ferrying B-17s over the Atlantic is a tedious business, and the young pilots working at it are only too glad to give dashing WW I flying ace Colonel Paul Hartley a chance to fly the plane.  But when enemy fighters come over, Hartley refuses to return the control to the crew, deliberately engages the enemy instead of fleeing for cloud cover, with the result being that the plane is shot up, the pilot killed, and the co-pilot injured.  Landing at the 918th base, he ruefully complains to Savage, a former pupil, that he is considered by the Air Force to be too old to fly.  His sympathies touched, Savage urges on General Stoneman the idea that Hartley would make a good commander for the new outfit, the 920th.  Stoneman isn't enthusiastic, but tells Savage to try him out.  On his first mission, Hartley takes off on his own again, breaking formation to fly into the teeth of enemy fighters when the conduct of the battle doesn't suit him.  He comes straggling into the base later with his plane badly shot up and two men dead, explaining that his elevator controls weren't working.  He denies trying to engage the enemy alone, says he hid in a cloud until they were gone.  But Savage ins't buying his story.  He has not confirmed his recommendations of Hartley to Stoneman, and he's reserving judgment on him until he sees if there are any more such stunts.  Ten missions later he is still not entirely satisfied that Hartley is a tamed eagle.  But when he's planning a mission and Hartley makes a suggestion for it, he can't help but listen.  The target is an ammunitions dump in a well-protected valley.  Savage plans to bomb it by crossing the valley at mountain top height.  Harley points out that a run down of the valley would give a much better opportunity to aim at and hit the target.  Savage argues a little -- with an ammo dump, all that's needed is one bomb to hit it. Yet when he lays out the mission, it's obvious he has heeded Hartley, for he sends out two squadrons, one to fly the length of the valley, one to cross over it, with weather to be the final determinant of which squadron does the bombing.  But before take off Stoneman comes to Savage with news from the injured co-pliot of the trans-Atlantic ferrying trip.  He's just regained consciousness, and it's the first word anyone has had of what really happened during the fighter attack.  With Hartley already in the air at the head of the squadron that's to fly down the valley, Savage takes off at the head of his own squadron, and when near enough to the other group, he begins radioing Hartley to abort the bombing.  Insisting to his squadron that it's too late to turn back, Hartley heads for the target while Savage orders the rest of his planes to turn back.  Then they watch as Hartley's plane takes several hits, begins going down while his men parachute to safety, then, guided by him, bears down on the target and simply crashes into it, making first a small explosion, then a tremendous one.  It was not in him, Savage decides later, to be anything but a hero.
 
Regular Cast:
 
Brig. Gen. Frank Savage... Robert Lansing
Maj. Harvey Stovall... Frank Overton
Maj. Joe Cobb... Lew Gallo
Doc Kaiser... Barney Phillips
 
Guest Cast:
 
Col. Paul Hartley... James Whitmore
Gen. Stoneman... John Zaremba
Capt. Franklin... William Arvin
Lt. Ditchik... Peter E. Deuel
Radio Operator... Nigel McKeand
Capt. Wayland... James Beck
Lt. Hearn... Jimmy Hayes
Lt. Miller... Glenn Sipes
Lt. Mason... William Cort
 
Credits:
 
Written by... Albert Aley
Directed by... Ralph Senensky

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SUPPORTING CAST

cast7.jpg

ABOVE: A shot of the cast of TOH.  From left to right, Lansing, Gallo, Larkin, and Overton.

John Larkin

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TOH MAGAZINE ARTICLES
 
Below are the magazine articles that I have that focus primarily on Bob's role as Gen. Savage and various other aspects of the show, including several features that discuss his controversial departure from the series.
 
First up is an article from the March 1965 issue of TV Star Parade magazine that discusses an injury Bob sustained to his hand while filming the episode "The Clash".

TV Star Parade March 1965, pt.1

TV Star Parade March 1965, pt.2

Below are brief bios on both Bob and John Larkin that appeared in the 1965 edition of TV Top Stars, a magazine published by the editors of TV Radio Mirror.

TV Top Stars 1965

Below is an article from the August 1965 issue of TV Picture Life entitled Robert Lansing: "The Real Reason I Was Fired from 12 O'Clock High".  It goes into great detail from Bob's perspective as to why he was let go from TOH and his reaction to it.  There are also several good photos, including three of him shirtless.  Enjoy! 

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.1

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.2

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.3

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.4

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.5

August 1965 TV Picture Life, Pg.6